Vaccines You Need for International Travel

Are you planning a trip out of the country or overseas? If so, then you may want to visit a clinic that offers immunizations for travel near Atlanta. Continue reading to learn about different travel vaccinations that you should consider getting before you go. travel - vaccine

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a liver disease that can be serious but is rarely fatal. This illness is spread by a virus present in the stool of infected people and can be transmitted through close contact and contaminated water or food. A few weeks after being infected, individuals may experience nausea, vomiting, fatigue, fever, loss of appetite, joint pain, jaundice, and abdominal pain. According to the CDC, you should receive a hepatitis A vaccine if you are traveling to any location where hepatitis A is common, some examples of which include Africa, many Asian and Eastern European countries, Mexico, Central America, and South America.

Typhoid Fever

Typhoid fever spreads through water or food that is contaminated with Salmonella typhi or Salmonella paratyphi. This illness usually incubates for a week or so, and its duration is typically about 3 to 4 weeks. Symptoms associated with typhoid fever include headaches, loss of appetite, diarrhea, lethargy, achiness, chest congestion, abdominal pain, and fever. South America, Mexico, India, Egypt, and Pakistan are considered high-risk areas for this illness, and many clinics now offer vaccines for typhoid fever.

Yellow Fever

Yellow fever is a virus found commonly in parts of Africa and South America. Early signs of this disease include flu-like symptoms, chills, and fever. After this, most people recover. However, yellow fever can progress to a third stage, some symptoms of which include vomiting blood, liver inflammation, and jaundice. This stage can also result in death. Typically, yellow fever is spread through mosquito bites. Close contact among people is not enough to spread this disease, but it can be transmitted through contaminated needles. Because this viral infection does not have a cure and can be lethal, the CDC recommends vaccinations for anyone who plans to travel to a country that has a risk of yellow fever transmission.