How to Deal with Heat Exhaustion

As the weather heats up, many people look forward to spending more time in the sun and outdoors while lounging at the beach, hiking local trails, and playing their favorite sports. While getting outdoors and staying active can be good for your health, your doctor near Atlanta will tell you that knowing how to recognize and handle heat exhaustion is important for staying safe in the summer. Continue reading to learn about dealing with heat exhaustion. heat - exhaustion

Spotting Symptoms

Heat exhaustion occurs when the body overheats, and it’s a condition that’s more severe than heat cramps but milder than heatstroke. The symptoms and signs of heat exhaustion can come on suddenly or develop over time, especially if you’re exercising for an extended period. If you’re suffering from heat exhaustion, then you may experience headache, nausea, muscle cramps, faintness, heavy sweating, fatigue, or dizziness. Other signs and symptoms include low blood pressure as you stand up, a weak and rapid pulse, and moist, cool skin with goosebumps, despite being in the heat.

Getting Treatment

Most cases of heat exhaustion can be addressed without a trip to a doctor or urgent care. Start by resting with your legs elevated above your heart while in a cool location, ideally in a building with air conditioning. Also, hydrate your body with sports drinks or water while avoiding anything with alcohol. You should also remove any unnecessary clothing and soak in a cool bath or take a cool shower if you can. If your symptoms do not improve within 1 hour, head to a clinic or seek medical attention right away.

Practicing Prevention

Luckily, heat exhaustion is very preventable. When the weather gets hot, remember to drink lots of fluids to stay hydrated, wear loose-fitting clothing that is light-colored and lightweight, and seek cooler areas if you begin to feel any symptoms of heat exhaustion. You should also protect your skin from sunburn, avoid particularly hot areas, and let your body become acclimated to the heat if temperatures suddenly rise or if you’re traveling somewhere hot this summer.