Is Chlamydia Dangerous?

Chlamydia is an extremely common STD that is easy to cure with medications but that can cause significant complications when it is left untreated. Women in particular need to be vigilant about getting tested for chlamydia, as their fertility could be in jeopardy if the disease is left untreated. Fortunately, discreet, anonymous STD testing in Atlanta is available at Perimeter Clinic, where you can walk in and get tested without an appointment. Here are the facts you need to know about chlamydia. doctor - treatment

What exactly is chlamydia?

Chlamydia is a bacterial infection that can be transmitted via vaginal, anal, and oral intercourse. Although anyone can get chlamydia, it is most common in people under 25 and in gay or bisexual men. Condoms can dramatically reduce the risk of contracting chlamydia, so people who have unprotected sex outside of a monogamous relationship are the most vulnerable. Note that a partner does not have to ejaculate for chlamydia to be transmitted.

What are the symptoms?

In both men and women, chlamydia frequently causes no symptoms, especially in the early stages of the infection. That is why STD testing is so important if you have risk factors, such as engaging in unprotected sex. Some people with chlamydia experience abnormal vaginal or penile discharge, painful urination, sore throats, and inflamed eyes. Women may have bleeding between their periods and painful intercourse if they are infected.

What are the complications of untreated chlamydia?

Untreated chlamydia is most dangerous to women. It can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, which in turn can lead to irreversible damage to the reproductive system. As a result, women may experience infertility and ectopic pregnancy, which could be life-threatening. For both men and women, having untreated chlamydia can increase the likelihood of contracting HIV, because the same behaviors that increase the risk of chlamydia exposure also increase the risk of HIV. Likewise, having chlamydia can make your body more vulnerable to infections like HIV.